THE NIGHTLY MIRROR
ive always hated the ending. final scene specifically. it seemed too neat to me, if that makes sense. more like the way they try to wrap up an episode of one of those Ripped From The Headlines shows on investigation discovery. and idk if rust gettin stabbed was some kind of emotional bloodletting that cured his fear of the world but his dialogue in that scene didnt sit well with me either.

Yep. I understood the idea that he felt like he was dying and that something strangely benevolent was happening, and then he woke up. But what irks me is the pluralism implied in the delivery. Maybe God was sitting on a big old cotton candy throne and thought he might show pouty little Rusty a glimpse of the angels before sending him back to be a fisher of men. I can see a thousand assholes nodding to themselves “maybe… maybe… maybe…” Have some guts. Don’t make me feel like an asshole for taking you seriously, know what I mean? I understand offering esoteric subtext to ambitious audience members throughout the show, but your conclusion has to be in good faith. You don’t give the idiots the ending. You let them sit around like bewildered shitstains wondering how to better live up to the bar you’ve raised.

Goddamnit.

16chakras:

Nicholas Evans (10 January 1907 – 5 February 2004) was a self-taught Welsh artist

16chakras:

Nicholas Evans (10 January 1907 – 5 February 2004) was a self-taught Welsh artist

bygoneamericana:

Broadway at Night, circa 1910.
By Alvin Langdon Coburn

"It is only at twilight," he wrote in 1911, "that the city reveals itself to me in the fullness [sic] of its beauty, when the arc lights on the Avenue click into being. Many an evening I have watched them and studied carefully just which ones appeared first and why. They begin somewhere about Twenty-sixth street, where it is darkest, and then gradually the great white globes glow one by one, up past the Waldorf and the new Library, like the stringing of pearls, until they burst out into a diamond pendant at the group of hotels at Fifty-ninth street. Probably there is a man at a switchboard somewhere, but the effect is like destiny, and regularly each night, like the stars, we have this lighting up of the Avenue."

bygoneamericana:

Broadway at Night, circa 1910.

By Alvin Langdon Coburn

"It is only at twilight," he wrote in 1911, "that the city reveals itself to me in the fullness [sic] of its beauty, when the arc lights on the Avenue click into being. Many an evening I have watched them and studied carefully just which ones appeared first and why. They begin somewhere about Twenty-sixth street, where it is darkest, and then gradually the great white globes glow one by one, up past the Waldorf and the new Library, like the stringing of pearls, until they burst out into a diamond pendant at the group of hotels at Fifty-ninth street. Probably there is a man at a switchboard somewhere, but the effect is like destiny, and regularly each night, like the stars, we have this lighting up of the Avenue."

I just finished watching the season finale again, and while the last scene is not so bad to me anymore, there is definitely something real Alan-Smithee about the whole direction of the last half of the series. What happened? Something is just a little off. The labyrinth is my favorite part. Billy Childress is strange enough. Something about the tone of the show changes, as if it was a remake with the characters acting against a green screen. ………………………………………… I don’t know.

I mean, if this is how Pizzolatto ends a season, what’s going to happen in season 2? Especially with Fukunaga not on it? Who knows.

I know my expectations were always way too high, but if something sits weird, it’s weird. That’s all there is. I would say nothing that nihilistic concludes itself in a way that satisfies, but that’s a dodge. We’ve all seen endings that have gutted us. I want to know who is responsible and I want them fired. Sincerely, teamgandalf88.

Thought to consider later. Dialectics are causal, so operate to fashion capitalism into the final stage of history by serving the rationalist project. Communism is non-causal. Dialectics point, but do not arrive. Communism is presence. 

"hard women, bad men" the motherfuckin motto

Fuck yes.

There was a whole thought I missed, what was it? Oh. The thing that impresses me about this central passage in True Detective is that it makes the series it’s own kind of science fiction. Philosophy creates a certain cosmology, and whatever it is, what is it like to live in that universe? That’s the show. Which is why the… materialism (?) of the next three episodes is so strange. Even if that mirrors the structure of The King in Yellow it’s adapting.

Those are the episodes I never got to download, so watching them today will be my first rewatch since February. 

Pizzolatto on terrible men, the active and passive damage men do.

T Bone Burnett regularly refers to True Detective as an 8 hour long film. That’s bad ass, because he must have done the whole thing as one work and not just episode to episode. Just small enough to have to take in one big chunk. I don’t know enough music to be able to do what he does, to choose so brilliantly, from such a wide pallette. I’d love to know more of the lingo of the job. “Cues”. Episode 5 is one long piece of music.

It’s nice in the Ep. 4 commentary that they talk about a fictional as opposed to documentary approach to music choices because I was thinking about that exact same thing watching this yesterday. 

Did you know True Detective and Top of the Lake had the same cinematographer? Adam Arkapaw. Have to watch Animal Kingdom and Lore now.